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Fire & Fantasy

Fire & Fantasy

September 8, 2017

Heavy Music Artwork 6th installation: Fire & Fantasy is centred around the concept of fantasy, imagination and escapism. No other...

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Avant-Garde

Avant-Garde

May 26, 2017

Heavy Music Artwork launches world’s first and only metal and rock art magazine - Issue 5 pre-sell: Avant-GardeFeaturing: Ulver, Sun O)))...

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Legacy

Legacy

March 10, 2017

The aging process affects pretty much everything in one way or another; but it may also lead to things being...

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Human

Human

January 20, 2017

The third issue of Heavy Music Artwork is an introspective outlook on music and art. Rock and metal have a...

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Folklore

Folklore

October 20, 2016

The second installment of Heavy Music Artwork is dedicated to Folk Art. Often referred to as ‘folklore’, it depicts the...

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Dark Nouveau

Dark Nouveau

July 20, 2016

The first issue is finally out and we feel inspired, happy and accomplished that we; the metal community; have a...

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Sam Shearon

Sam Shearon

September 19, 2017

Sam Shearon talks with Heavy Music Artwork Sam Shearon Aka ‘Mister-Sam’...

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Maciej Kamuda

Maciej Kamuda

July 5, 2017

The art of being yourself Most of all I'm self-taught. I...

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Cosimo Miorelli

Cosimo Miorelli

July 1, 2017

Man at work Like most people, I always drew as a...

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Rainer Kalwitz

Rainer Kalwitz

June 28, 2017

Phantastic Realism I had studied graphic arts at the university of...

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Lukasz Wodynski

Lukasz Wodynski

June 20, 2017

Living beings I graduated The School Of Fine Arts in my...

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Max Martelli

Max Martelli

June 14, 2017

Passion for Science Fiction Ever since I was young I was...

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Christian Sloan Hall

Christian Sloan Hall

June 8, 2017

The power of perseverance I was born in Santa Monica, California...

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Mike D from Killswitch Engage

Mike D from Killswitch Engage

May 31, 2017

DarkIcon studio profile All of Killswitch Engage's album artwork and tour...

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Top 10 Albums that changed my life by Drew Zaragoza of Sinicle

Top 10 Albums that changed my life by Drew Zaragoza of Sinicle

August 25, 2017

Drew Zaragoza is the front man for LA Power Trio Sinicle. He has led the band for over a decade. Los Angeles power trio Sinicle combine the groove of Heavy...

Top 10 Bands that inspired my music by Drew Rizzo of Midnite Hellion

Top 10 Bands that inspired my music by Drew Rizzo of Midnite Hellion

August 22, 2017

Drew Rizzo is the drummer and founder of Trenton, NJ’s own MIDNITE HELLION, a US Heavy Metal band formed in 2011.  He eats, breathes, and sleeps Heavy Metal, and here’s...

Metastazis & Au Dessus: End of Chapter (Les Acteurs de l'Ombre)

Metastazis & Au Dessus: End of Chapter (Les Acteurs de l'Ombre)

July 21, 2017

There were no specific directions, the band gave me total freedom to provide my interpretation of the title. I interpreted 'End of a chapter' as plain death. And I wanted...

Robert Schober aka Roboshobo & Ghost: Cirice (Universal)

Robert Schober aka Roboshobo & Ghost: Cirice (Universal)

July 14, 2017

‘Cirice’ concept was inspirited by Brian De Palma film ‘Carrie’. The idea originated with Papa himself. He wanted to set the video in a school and do a talent show...

Napalm Death & Frode Sylthe: Apex Predator, Easy Meat (Century Media)

Napalm Death & Frode Sylthe: Apex Predator, Easy Meat (Century Media)

July 7, 2017

The band have been very much involved in the process of making this album artwork. And they tend to have a lot of ideas in which direction it all should...

Nestor Avalos & Bloodbath: Grand Morbid Funeral (Peaceville Records)

Nestor Avalos & Bloodbath: Grand Morbid Funeral (Peaceville Records)

June 30, 2017

We started from the concept of the band and the name of the album 'Grand Morbid Funeral'. This was the determinant factor for the whole process 'a place of plague...

Sikth & Dan Mumford: Opacities (Peaceville Records)

Sikth & Dan Mumford: Opacities (Peaceville Records)

June 23, 2017

I have known most of the guys in SikTh for quite a long time, I grew up in Watford, the same town that SikTh came from, and was playing in...

Obituary & Andreas Marschall: Inked in Blood (Relapse Records)

Obituary & Andreas Marschall: Inked in Blood (Relapse Records)

June 16, 2017

The idea for ‘Inked in Blood’ was developed by the Tardy brothers and me, based on an early suggestion sketch, when the band decided to move visually in a different...

Michael Berberian from E-Kunst

Michael Berberian from E-Kunst

June 9, 2017

The art of E-Kunst Mostly known as the founder of the record label Season of Mist, Michael S. Berberian has been using metal festival for years as an alibi to visit...

Camden Rocks Festival

Camden Rocks Festival

May 12, 2017

Camden Rocks Festival, established in 2009, is an exclusive festival held in London’s notorious Camden Town bringing you the best selection of rock, indie, metal and alternative music. Camden has...

Thomas Eakins

Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), painter, photographer, and teacher. Eakins, Philadelphia-born, was a painter of scientific bent, an urban provincial in the American materialist tradition, whose restricted life in an uncongenial postbellum society forced him into lonely concentration on the question of what authentic art should be. He rejected conventional painting of his time for what he considered its structural flaws and false emotion. Instead, he sought to paint the human figure in space with factual accuracy and genuine feeling. Before committing himself to art, he had considered careers in surgery and singing and never really put those options aside: his major portraits are of men of medicine and women vocalists. And his lifework consisted of profound, even obsessive, study of anatomy and perspective, two systems of nature that, properly understood and put to use, afford power to heal the body or to inspire empathetic response in an audience.

The son of a master calligrapher, Eakins grew up among intellectuals and artists, many of whom he would later paint. After a four-year stint at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris, he returned to Philadelphia for good. There, isolated from both fashionable and avant-garde art movements, burdened by psychological conflicts, and mostly unappreciated, he pressed his research into the structure of bodies through dissection and into perspective through his own system of measurements. These disciplines he taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and elsewhere. In the early 1880s, his interest in human and animal mobility led him to experiments in photography inspired by Eadweard Muybridge.

Eakins's early studies were of his own family members in their heavily curtained drawing room. After his mother's death, he took his bearings outdoors with meticulous studies of friends sculling and sailing on local waters. Then in 1875, he produced a work so singular that his public reputation was ruined. The Gross Clinic is a monumental work centered on a portrait of a surgeon midway through an operation. Thoughtful, even world-weary, he stands by the patient among black-coated assistants. Blood fills the incision and stains the hands of the doctor and his assistants. Various levels of interpretation suggest themselves today, but to an audience only a decade away from the surgical barbarities of the Civil War, the effect was "sickening."

ntended for the Centennial Exposition of 1876, the painting was rejected and was hung instead in an outlying mock-up of an army hospital. In 1878, Philadelphia's Jefferson Medical College bought it for two hundred dollars. Today it is acknowledged as one of the masterpieces of nineteenth-century art.
Eakins once wrote, "my honors are misunderstanding, persecution and neglect," and his later work reflects both disappointment and obstinate dedication. He painted a Crucifixion, an odd subject for an artist of Quaker background. He made a number of arcadian studies of nude youths. His portraits show single figures deep in thought, posed with awkward naturalness in shadowed space. Most were rejected by the sitters as unflattering. In 1887, he painted an aged Walt Whitman. A second surgical tableau, The Agnew Clinic, though milder in spirit, was no less attacked than the first one. Only in the next generation did his work begin to win respect, first by painters of the New York Ashcan school. Robert Henri, one of that group and an influential teacher and writer, called Eakins "one of the very great men in all American art," a judgment history accepts today.

From: Houghton Mifflin Companion to US History

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